Restaurant Design Trend: THE BRANDING WALL

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Restaurant Design Trend: THE BRANDING WALL

Creating a visual identity on the interior enhances brand recognition and the overall customer experience.  First, a definition...

Branding Wall  a mural or accent wall featuring graphic representation of the brand.  

Likely the result of a resurgence in the classic arts of typography and calligraphy in graphic design.  The branding wall design trend is both beautiful and functional.   Some our favorites below:

Photo: Loop Creative

SHED 5 RESTAURANT  Melbourne, AU
by Loop Creative

Great article on the design here: Kaper Design

Photo: Panco Sassano

BURBAR RESTAURANT  MAR DEL PLATA, AR
BY PANCO SASSANO

More of the design here: Panco Sassano

Photo: Rice Creative

MONJO COFFEE  HO CHI MINH CITY, VN
BY RICE CREATIVE

More of the design here.

Photo: Estudio Atillo

GRAN MERCADO COCINA  ROSARIO, AR
BY ESTUDIO ATILLO

More of the design here.

Photo: Charles Smith Design

BYRON HAMBURGERS   LONDON, UK
BY CHARLES SMITH DESIGN

More images of this and other locations here.

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IMPROVING THE DESIGNER AND CHEF RELATIONSHIP

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IMPROVING THE DESIGNER AND CHEF RELATIONSHIP

Takeaways from THE DESIGNER AND CHEF 2.0

A Panel by The American Institute of Architects SF on March 31, 2015

A panel of San Francisco Designer and chef teams discussed the conception of restaurants they created together.  The conversation centered on the chef/designer relationship and the design process of uniting design concept with cuisine to realize a restaurant.  As a designer working with chefs and restaurant owners, a few comments struck me as helpful in an effort to improve the relationship. 

3 takeaways to improve designer and chef relationship

 

1. CRAFT  

Designers and chefs aren't so different.  Bryan Southwick of CCS Architecture mentioned a shared passion for our craft and dedication to create an authentic experience that everyone will enjoy including our peers. The restaurant is where design meets food uniting the collective visions of two artists.  Both chef and designer improve their execution over time to produce unique dishes and spaces.  Understanding our similarities establishes mutual respect and enhances the depth and quality of the relationship.

Chef David Lawrence of 1300 on Fillmore at Food and Jazz  Fresh Starts Chef Events.  Photograph by Neely Wang

Chef David Lawrence of 1300 on Fillmore at Food and Jazz  Fresh Starts Chef Events.  Photograph by Neely Wang

2. FIT

D and C teams collaborate well together when the fit is right.  Chef David Lawrence of 1300 on Fillmore mentioned that he wanted to ensure that he and the designer were speaking the same language.  Essentially, the designer understands your ideas and can help you realize your vision.  Jim Zack of Zack / De Vito Architecture advised designers to "design the experience".  I couldn't agree more - the designer should be a stakeholder in the success of the restaurant dedicated to creating the right atmosphere for guests.

3. FLEXIBILITY

The success of a restaurant is about the entire experience but the chef and his staff are there day to day.  So, designers should pay close attention to functional requirements provided by the chef to ensure that the layout facilitates operations. Likewise, a chef should be receptive to the recommendations of the designer to ensure the space is cohesive and meets code requirements.

Ultimately, the key to a successful designer and chef team is in the relationship itself.  The right team collaborating with passion throughout the design process is a recipe for a successful and well-designed restaurant.


The panel was moderated by  David Darling of Aidlin Darling Design, the firm behind one of my favorites, Bar Agricole.  More more about the event, visit the AIA SF.

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5 Ways to Increase Restaurant Seating

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5 Ways to Increase Restaurant Seating

Galeto Brazilian Steakhouse  Oakland, CA

Galeto Brazilian Steakhouse  Oakland, CA

1. COMMUNAL TABLE

Communal tables are a popular and efficient dining solution.  On a budget? Group tables together to form one large communal table.  To enhance the effect - place the tables in a focal area like the chef's table at Galeto Brazilian Grill above.

Girl and Goat by 555 International

Girl and Goat by 555 International

2. BANQUETTE

Create intimacy and increase capacity with banquette or booth seating.  Not only will you seat more guests, they will also spend more.  According to a Cornell study, customers in booths spent 45% more on average than those at tables. To save on cost, manufacturers like International Upholstery provide banquettes in standard or custom sizes.

Lee's Sandwiches  Dublin, CA

Lee's Sandwiches  Dublin, CA

3. DINING COUNTER

Make use of extra wall or storefront space with a dining counter.  Counters encourage socializing and are comfortable for working or eating alone.  Former San Francisco mayor, Willie Brown, shares his favorite counter dining spots in this article

Bambino Restaurant by Aidlin Darling Design

Bambino Restaurant by Aidlin Darling Design

4. RECTANGULAR TWO-TOP

Not as sexy as the others but the two-top table is the most flexible seating option. An entire restaurant can be designed using only two-tops and accommodate groups of any size.  Tip: Always have extra two-tops on hand just in case.

Battery Wharf Hotel   Boston, MA

Battery Wharf Hotel   Boston, MA

5.  OUTDOOR SEATING

Take advantage of outdoor space and increase seating capacity.  On a nice day, guests will wait for a patio spot giving you an edge over competitors.  Worried about the weather?  Heat lamps placed strategically increase the amount of time you can use the outdoor space.

Remember: The ideal furniture layout adapts to best accommodate your guests and enhances your design concept.  Questions or need help designing a layout?  Email us – we are happy to help.

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Luxe Restaurant and Hotel Remodel

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Luxe Restaurant and Hotel Remodel

A high concept makeover of France's Abbaye Royale de Fontevraud by Jouin Manku and Sanjit Manku that takes your breath away.  Historic preservation restrictions prevented altering the structure inspiring creative design solutions that celebrate the stunning Romanesque and Gothic architecture.  The elegant juxtaposition of Modern and Medieval features streamlined, multipurpose furnishings and an organic palette which incorporates natural materials: wood, linen, wool, leather, and metal.

For more info on the design,  see article from Interior Design Magazine

Photos: Dezeen, Architectural Digest, Interior Design Magazine

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